© 2010 Kim more money

Swiss Money

Swiss money is really pretty with its bright colors and different sizes. Unfortunately, due to the expensive nature of the land, the cash flows out of your hand very quickly. Switzerland is one of the most expensive places in the world to live with Tokyo being the most expensive. The Swiss money is called FRANC and is the official currency of Switzerland and Liechtenstein. It is abbreviated CHF or Sfr. Sfr is the old way of marking prices and stands for Swiss Franc. You do see that once in a while. The CHF is seen every where and is the current way of marking prices and stands for Confoederatio Helvetica franc. The Swiss did not covert to the Euro like many of the other European countries. The francs come in coins and bills. The coins are anything from 5, 10, 20, 1/2 (centimes) which would be similar to cents. The 20 franc coin (centimes) is similar to 20 cents. 1/2  franc is similar to 50 cents, but much smaller then a half dollar in the US. There are also 1, 2 and 5 francs coins which would be similar to dollars. So 2 francs would be like spending 2 dollars, but it is a coin. The bills (paper money) comes in 10, 20, 50, 100, 200, and 1000 francs. The bills get progressively bigger as the value increases.The exchange rate between the US dollar and the Swiss franc is not too bad right now. It is pretty close to 1:1. When Zach went to London, that exchange rate was terrible. 1:1.6 or 200 CHF will get you 125 Pounds. Great Britain still uses the Pound.

Comments

  1. Wendy Brown
    Posted September 24, 2010 at 2:35 am | #

    I do like the European money. It is pretty, but does take some getting used to. I remember trying to figure out what each of the coins in England meant. I would hold them in my hand and then have to count them all out to see how I could pay for my purchase. It seemed odd to have a pound coin instead of a note. I guess I’m just too used to the U.S. dollar.
    Thanks for sharing the pictures.

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